The pleasurable activity of “ sanging” or digging ginseng was also one of the most profitable for frontier families. The hardwood forests of Appalachia were the ideal environment for this hardy perennial. Through most of the 19th century tons of ginseng were shipped annually to Asia where it was highly valued for its medicinal properties. In mountain communities, it played an important role as a source of ready cash for subsistence farmers. By the end of the 19th century, over-harvesting led to a sharp decline in production, and poaching on private and public lands remains a problem. Ginseng production remains profitable and sustainable by careful cultivation of commercial ginseng or if only the older wild plants are harvested and their seeds replanted.

Multimedia:

Below is the Digital Heritage Moment as broadcast on the radio:

[audio:http://digitalheritage.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Gensing60Mx.mp3|titles=Gensing60Mx]

Related Posts

  • Hot SpringsHot Springs Located in Madison County at the confluence of the French Broad River and Spring Creek, Hot Springs has long been a destination for therapeutic relief. First Native Americans, then […]
  • Leona T. Hayes, 1978Leona T. Hayes, 1978 Leona T. Hayes receiving the award in 1978. More Images
  • Ben LongBen Long Ben Long, an internationally acclaimed American painter, grew up in Statesville, North Carolina. In the 1970s the then unknown artist persuaded the priest in charge of two small, rural […]
  • H. F. Robinson, 1979H. F. Robinson, 1979     Robinson Presented Heritage Award During Building Dedication At WCU Dr. H.F. Robinson, Chancellor of Western Carolina University, was presented the 1979 […]
  • Mary Ulmer Chiltosky, 1986Mary Ulmer Chiltosky, 1986   Chiltoskey Receives Mountain Heritage Award Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey – teacher, librarian and keeper of Cherokee tribal myths, legend and medicine lore – was presented with the […]