Historical Markers


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In 1935, North Carolina created one of the nation’s first highway historical marker programs to point out places of historic interest to the motoring public.  Over 1400 of the silver and black highway signs have been erected throughout the state.  At least one stands in each county.  Places associated with individuals or events of statewide historical significance are eligible for inclusion in the program.  Nominations are evaluated by a committee of historians.  After selection, the historical significance of the place is described in a very brief description consisting of a dozen or so words.  A printed guide lists each marker, its inscription, and location.  These historical markers add to the enjoyment and awareness of travelers on state highways.

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