Jack in the Beanstalk Poster made between 1936-1941 in NY as a WPA Art Project, Library of Congress American Memory

Grade Level: Fourth Grade Lesson Plan

Subject: Social Studies, English/Language Arts, Computer and Technology/ Information Skills

By Sherri Arrington

Hazelwood Elementary School – Haywood County Schools

This project will expose children to the art of storytelling with Southern Appalachian folklore. Students will create a handbook which depicts the changes in the western North Carolina region while preserving the past through storytelling. Students will enjoy hearing stories read from the books, The Jack Tales, and Grandfather Tales as retold by Richard Chase. The unit will coincide with the study of the mountain region of North Carolina, the writing of personal narratives, and the exposure to the genres of folktales and drama.

Adventures of the American Mind- Western Carolina University

VIEW THIS LESSON PLAN

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